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"Catch and Kill" by Ronan Farrow; Little Brown (464 pages, $30) ___ At first, I wasn't sure I wanted to read Ronan Farrow's book. I didn't want to spend hours with a revolving cast of powerful men accused of doing unspeakable things to women, with impunity or the next best thing. I didn't want more evidence that women can matter so little, that we can be interchangeable orifices to a ...

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"Takes One to Know One" by Susan Isaacs; Grove Press (355 pages, $26) ___ Corie Geller has it all, it seems. At 35, she's married to a kind and crazy-handsome judge, has adopted his sweet teen daughter and lives in a tony Long Island neighborhood. She works from home, using her language skills to help publishers evaluate books written in Arabic for English translations. Sounds pretty nice. So ...

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"The Girl Who Reads on the Metro" by Christine Feret-Fleury, translated from the French by Ros Schwartz; Flatiron Books (175 pages, $22.99) ___ This quirky little novel is part fable, part romance, and wholly a love letter to books. Juliette works in a realty office in Paris with her friend Chloe - an uninspired job that she carries out rather halfheartedly. Her real passion is books - reading ...

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"The Way Through the Woods: On Mushrooms and Mourning" by Long Litt Woon, translated from the Norwegian by Barbara J. Haveland; Spiegel & Grau (291 pages, $26) ___ When Malaysian-born anthropologist Long Litt Woon's lodestar, her beloved husband Eiolf Olsen, fell over dead in 2010, she was left shellshocked by sorrow, and largely isolated in her adopted homeland of Norway. "There was nothing ...

"Make It Scream, Make It Burn" by Leslie Jamison; Little, Brown (272 pages, $28) ___ The title of Leslie Jamison's "Make It Scream, Make It Burn" refers to 19th-century photographer Jacob Riis becoming so focused on creating an image that he nearly lit his subjects on fire. Which neatly summarizes Jamison's own attitude toward the people she writes about. Jamison's essays are united by her ...

"Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and the Drug Company That Addicted America" by Beth Macy; Back Bay Books (400 pages, $17.99) ___ If you don't know anyone who has died of an opioid overdose, odds are you will. By 2016, Beth Macy writes in "Dopesick," her riveting nonfiction account of the epidemic, "Drug overdose had already taken the lives of 300,000 Americans over the past fifteen years, and ...

"The Last Good Guy" by T. Jefferson Parker; G.P. Putnam's Sons (352 pages, $27) ___ White supremacists seem destined to be the new ISIS in thrillers - i.e., widely despised villains - and they make a good case in this third novel about private investigator Roland Ford. T. Jefferson Parker's dozens of L.A.-set crime novels exist in the shadow of Michael Connelly's better-known books, but the ...

"The Girl From Berlin" by Ronald H. Balson; St. Martin's Press (384 pages, $27.99) ___ At the heart of "The Girl From Berlin" sits a simmering property dispute involving an idyllic home in Tuscany where Gabriella Vincenzo sometimes plays a violin in the early morning as the sun rises over a small vineyard. But the disagreement over who owns the farm spans generations and countries and touches ...

"Ludicrous: The Unvarnished Story of Tesla Motors" by Edward Niedermeyer; BenBella Books (220 pages, $27.95) ___ Those who pay close attention to Elon Musk tend to fall into one of two camps. One camp worships Musk as a modern-day hero at a time when heroes are in short supply. He's a green-energy wizard devoted to saving humanity from greenhouse gas destruction, and if that proves impossible, ...

"No Judgments" by Meg Cabot; William Morrow (384 pages, $26.99) ___ Meg Cabot's hurricane prep checklist for women living in the Florida Keys: Flashlight and batteries, check. Plenty of pet food, check. Wisecracking guy with electric blue eyes who loves dogs, knows his way around a chainsaw and has a penchant for loosely buttoned linen shirts that expose his taut, tan belly above his low-slung ...